Immunity Status - Rubella Virus

This test checks for immunity to the virus that causes rubella.

PLEASE NOTE: ALL RESULTS AND INFORMATION PROVIDED BY HEALTH eLABS ARE INTENDED FOR GENERAL HEALTH INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. AS SUCH THEY ARE NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE OR A MEDICAL EXAMINATION, AND SHOULD NOT BE USED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, PREVENT OR CURE ANY DISEASE, SYNDROME, OR CONDITION WITHOUT THE SUPERVISION OF A LICENSED PHYSICIAN.

$40.00

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This test can also be purchased bundled as the Immune Titer – MMR panel.

PREPARATION: No fasting or other special preparation is needed for this test.

What does this test do?

This test checks for immunity to the virus that causes rubella.

Why is this important?

The rubella virus is highly contagious, and is easily transmitted from person to person through the air by coughing, sneezing, and other airborne methods. It causes rubella (also called German measles), a disease which is characterized by a rash that lasts for three days that usually starts on the face, then spreads to the rest of the body. The rash can be itchy, but is not as bright red as the rash caused by measles. Other symptoms of rubella include fever, sore throat, fatigue, joint pain, and swollen lymph nodes that may last a few weeks.

In the majority of cases rubella is a mild, self-limited disease; in fact about half of infected people experience mild or no symptoms at all. Complications do occur however, and may include bleeding problems, testicular swelling, and inflammation of nerves.

The most devstating complication from rubella infection occurs in women, if the virus is contraced during early pregnancy. The rubella virus may cause a miscarriage or lead to a Congenital Rubella Syndrome, charcterized by birth defects such as eye cataracts, deafness, and abnormalities of the child’s heart or brain.

Prior to the vaccine era, rubella was responsible for millions of cases each year around the globe. During the latter half of the 20th century, however, the incidence of rubella declined by more than 90 percent due to efforts to immunize young children against infection with the rubella virus.

The vaccine works to stimulate the production of antibodies, which are molecules that help the immune system target and destroy the viruses when they try to enter the body. As long as these antibodies circulate in the bloodstream in sufficient quantities, the likelihood of a rubella virus infection stays low.

What do the results mean?

This test determines the presence of antibodies to the rubella virus circulating in the bloodstream. In other words, if you have either had rubella in the past, or if you’ve been immunized against rubella, then you should have antibodies to the virus and a positive result indicates ongoing protection.

A negative result means that you do not have a significant number of the expected antibodies, and you are no longer immune to the rubella virus. If this is the case you should talk to your doctor about what the results mean, as well as the pros and cons of getting vaccinated.